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    TEXAS VOX BLOG

    Activism from the Lone Star state
    Energy, Environment, and Ethics
    with a Texas Twang

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    Stopping the Nuclear Relapse 

    The nuclear power industry is pushing for a revival of nuclear energy. The industry is aggressively seeking to license and build the first new nuclear reactors in a generation. Toward this end, nuclear companies have sought public approval by disingenuously presenting the energy source as clean, renewable, and necessary to deal with global warming, environmental degradation, and dwindling petroleum resources.

    Energy companies are already pursuing the necessary permits to build and operate new reactors in a growing number of locations.

    Federal efforts to resuscitate a nuclear industry that was DOA come with a cost: your tax dollars (over $13 billion) are being spent to support the companies that want to build new nukes, transferring the considerable financial risk from corporations to taxpayers. Public Citizen, through its Energy Program, is actively debunking nuclear industry propaganda and challenging new reactors at the state and federal level while vigorously working to promote viable energy solutions.

    Proposed Reactors in Texas

    Energy companies already are pursuing permits to build and operate 34 new reactors throughout the country. Despite the prohibitive cost and fatal flaws of nuclear power, 17 applications to build new nuclear reactors have been submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four of these have been submitted within the state of Texas. Public Citizen Texas opposes all of these plants and has joined the Sustainable Energy and Economic Development (SEED) Coalition as a legal intervener in the Comanche Peak and South Texas Project (STP) licensing process. The legal cases made against Comanche Peak and STP are some of the most successful of their kind nationwide. STP has more contentions accepted by the administrative court than in any other case. Comanche Peak is unique because the administrative court admitted a contention that the license application did not adequately consider energy alternatives and advances in energy storage technology.

    Click here to see a table with the current status of Texas nuclear applications.

    South Texas Project

    Comanche Peak

    Victoria 

    Amarillo 

    Click here to see a summary of nuclear interventions brought against South Texas Project and Comanche Peak.

    For more links to fighting nuclear power in Texas, click here.

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